Thursday, November 24, 2016

d'Albert, Eugen. (1864-1932. Symphony No. 4.

From my collection.
Bought in January 2013.
First listen: 31-1-2013.
Second listen: 24-11-2016.
Label: CPO.
Recording dates: December 2007.
Recording venue: Stadthalle Osnabrück, Europasaal, Germany.
Recording engineer: Simon Böckenhoff.
Running time: 66:56.
Classical relevance: Worthwhile but sample first.

Works performed:
Seejungfräulein, opus 15, for Soprano and Orchestra.
Symphony No. 4 in F major for large orchestra.

Performed by:
Anna Kasyan, Soprano.
Osnabrücker Symphonieorchester, Hermann Bäumer.

This CD I reviewed in my pre-blog time, so this is the first on my blog, although I heard this CD before. Not that I could remember much of it. For it took me almost a full three years before attempting this music again. I guess too many CD'S at the time, and not enough time, as with any collector.
Anyways, if you like your music dreamlike, with not too many outbursts, that d'Albert is your man. He almost writes with the intention of the likes of Bruckner and Mahler, but curiously enough this Symphony has the lightness and gaiety of a Mendelssohn, and Bruch in its more optimistic mood.
Most of the writing has a lightness over it that denies the age in which it is written, and the serious strains he lets you hear in his SQ for example, makes the symphony a mystery for me. There is no seriousness in it, neither something else, it simply flows, and finds it's way without being obtrusive or in any way disconcerting, simply music without pretensions but beautiful nevertheless.  Sensual music someone even called it. And that hits the nail on it's head I guess. If this sounds a bit confusing, then I would agree, but this is the way I express my confusion. 
It is well conceived and with a purpose, but that purpose escapes me for now. More listening is demanded.
Opus 15 made an impression on me! After 2 minutes of singing my ears began to hurt, and I aborted it forthwith. Ughhh, not my cup of tea.
The performance of the symphony is exemplary, and the recording superb. A slight reservation though....when the trumpets and flutes combine in an outburst of sound, it is a bit grating on the ears. Apart from this, lots of detail, and depth in the sound stage.




Salvatore, Giovanni. (c.1610-1688) Works for Harpsichord and Organ, plus a Missa.

New acquisition. Date of purchase: November 2017. First listen: 22-11-2017. Label: Glossa. Recording dates: October 1998 & June 1999...