Friday, October 14, 2016

Fesca, Alexander Ernst. (1820-1849) Piano trios No. 2 & 5. Third rerun.

From my collection.
Bought in July 2016.
First listen: 23-7-2016.
Second rerun: 22-8-2016.
Third rerun: 14-10-2016.
Originally released in 2014.
Label: CPO
Recording dates: June 2012.
Recording venue: Kammermusikstudio SWR Stuttgart, Germany.
Recording engineer: Friedemann Trumpp.
Running time: 64:54.
Classical relevance: A worthwhile addition to your collection.

Works performed:
Piano Trio No. 2, opus 12 in E minor& No. 5, opus 46 in B minor.

Performed by:
Trio Paian.


Fesca was an unlucky fellow, he died at the age of 29, succumbing to tuberculosis, and therefore never fully developed  his talent, be it that these piano trios make you hear the ultimate promise of what might have become a fine composer. His father before him was a well known and respected composer, Friedrich Ernst Fesca (1789-1826) who died also young of the same disease.
He was of course a contemporary of Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahmsian composers alive then. This old sod of a Robert Schumann thought that it was quite normal to burn down a composer who was still struggling to make his way into musical society by writing a very silly and stupid piece in this flimsy excuse of a magazine called "Neue zeitschrift für Musik". Without ever seeing the score, he said that it where all butterfly melodies for the ladies, which is all very pleasing but only for a little while. Butterfly nature indeed, and what the deuce is wrong with that? Schumann was not able to write butterflies in his music! Music for the mediocre is another horse on which Schumann rides prominently in this piece, as if he is the definition of what is mediocre and what not?!  Well he goes on in that vein for some time, but he must have been in a very somber mood, for he was dead wrong in his assessment. For a 20 year old composer these are near perfect in a romantic context.
So what to expect...O, dear yes, an abundance of melodies, tumbling over each other like a whole bunch of butterflies, and in pretty colours mind, just to please the ladies.....and this guy. Deeply romantic, passionate as is befitting of his time, and well written to boot. Period!
It's overflowing with a myriad of creatively written details, just one surprise after another, and cleverly done, mind you. So,.... was this temporarily demented reviewer wrong in his amateurish review? Of course he was! It would be, like me writing a review about a new model from Porsche, without ever have driven in it, and damn it to kingdom come. 
This music will please the mediocre and the not so mediocre, in fact it will move many a heart. And rightly so, Fesca deserves to be heard and appreciated, I know I do.
The performance and sound are top notch. Yes I recommend it!




  

Bach, Johann Sebastian (1685-1750) The Complete Organ Works. Hanssler Edition. (CD 4)

After listening to the fourth disc in this series on which Andrea Macon plays early works by Bach I decided to stop wasting my time with him...